All posts by brooks

Whoops, forgot something!

Sorry, forgot to write that I added “The Secession” as a subpage as well!  We didn’t think that people noticed you could click on it and not just hover over it so we added it as a subpage so people could more easily click on it for that information.

Update 4/16

Not much to update on for this week.  Both Eben and I went through the pages and improve the content/edited grammatical issues that we have seen.  I also changed the header image on a couple of the pages (like the timeline one).  We are both trying to figure out how to change the bottom of the ‘Home’ screen to something other than links to our other pages without having to change our theme and start our customization all over again.  If anyone is using our same theme, any suggestions? We would like the bottom to be links to digital archives to learn more about the Mormon migration.

We are both adding citations to all of our pages while still trying to keep it aesthetically pleasing for our audience.  I also changed the background for the timeline so it will all be black instead of a majority black and some white.

4/10/17 Update

I haven’t come across many conflicts with my website updates this time around (except for dumb things that have taken me way too long to figure out like centering a photo, etc).  I believe that I have roughly finished the timeline, but I would love to get some feedback on it.  It is rough (keep that in mind) and I tried to give a brief timeline of Mormonism as well as the migrations.

I believe that we will be deleting the Mountain Meadows Massacre page, as we can’t give it enough attention at this point in the semester.  We are also having some difficulties with headers/photos/and page titles.  But, I think that we are going to edit our photos to have the page title on the photo directly, so we don’t have to deal with editing header preferences (since it isn’t working in our favor).

Other than that, the rough draft of our content is all on the website and we are currently working on editing the content and making sure that it all makes sense and looks good.

Update 4/3/2017

I have been working on the timeline for our site, so please check it out and give any feedback you can. It took me way longer than necessary to figure out that I had been copying the wrong code to embed the timeline into the site and that’s why it was showing up wrong. So, if anyone is having trouble with the timeline showing up, make sure you copy the code that google docs gives you and then paste it into the timeline website, then copy the link it gives you after that.

Also, has anyone tried putting a map into their timeline? I am attempting to copy a google map into the timeline but it won’t show up for some reason. I’ll keep playing around with it to try and figure it out.

Other than that, I have been putting information onto our timeline with pictures. We have also been putting new images into our header to differentiate the different pages. We put subpages into our main secession page so that there isn’t as much information on one page and it doesn’t overwhelm the viewers.

We have been going through our scanned in documents to gather more information for our website. We have been filling in the information on our pages and our “Who Are The Mormons” page is tentatively complete. For those that don’t know anything about Mormons, could you read through it and let us know if the information is okay or if we need more? Thanks!

Madison & Eben Update

As our course is only meeting once a week from now on, Eben and I thought it best to meet during the time we have already set aside on Mondays for the course.

This week we had an extensive visit at the SUU Special Collections and hit a gold mine of resources. We found a Mormon Migration book that gives several specific timelines for the Mormon Pioneers as well as the religion itself. We studied a book that was partly written by Brigham Young about the proposed state of Deseret and learned much about the original plans for the Mormon Migration. We scanned in most of the book to cite as well as a map drawn by Brigham Young of his desired territory. We also found a journal written by a pioneer in the second Mormon Migration and scanned in his accounts of the brutal journey. The pioneer also quotes Brigham Young and his attempt for Zion as it was “necessary for self-sufficiency”– which goes perfectly with our project.

We have also been playing around with Story Maps and having some difficulties. However, we did find out that one of our professors at SUU recently went to a conference about the program and is an expert at it. We are pursuing help from him to get more one-on-one assistance. Slowly we have been adding more information to our site, a home page, pages, and information on the secession. We will be adding more this weekend. We have also scheduled another trip to the Archives for next week and scanned in several documents we are still studying.

Progress Update

This last week I was able to visit the site of Mountain Meadows Massacre here in Southern Utah. Although the event does not directly correlate with our project, it was a somber and educational experience to set a motivation for this project.

Eben and I drew out a tentative layout of how we would like to compose our site. We have not published/edited our actual site as of yet, as we are still trying to figure out our layout. On Monday, since we will both be back to Southern Utah, we will begin our first publication of the website. I have also been playing around and exploring the Word Press site to familiarize myself better with the website.

Updated Contract

Madison & Eben Contract Draft (updated)

Goal:

The goal of our project is to create a physical portrayal of the Latter Day Saint secession from the United States Government. Although this part of history is well known to most Utah residents, it is new or unfamiliar to others in the United States. We hope to create a user friendly and aesthetically pleasing website to educate general public on the secessionist movement of the LDS.
We will outline their path and the altercations they had with non-Mormons- peaceful and violent. Once they got to Utah, at that time part of Mexico, they believed they were free of U.S. control and Brigham Young (Joseph Smith’s controversial successor) established a theocracy in the territory. But after the Mexican-American War, the US gained the Utah Territory, and Mormons were subject once again to US jurisdiction. They were denied statehood for 50 years due to their polygamous practices, the third president of the LDS church (John Taylor) even stating “God is greater than the United States, and when the Government conflicts with heaven, we will be ranged under the banner of heaven against the Government. The United States says we cannot marry more than one wife. God says different”. The fourth president (Wilford Woodruff), however, ended polygamy in the faith after claiming to receive a revelation from God, and Utah gained statehood six years later. Therefore, our project will emphasize the pioneer movement of the Latter Day Saints and how they seceded from the United States Government.
Our project will include real photos and journal entries from the pioneers fleeing the persecution of the East and early settlements of pioneers in Utah. Our website will include a timeline of the Mormon secessionism from the United States Government as well as a map for the viewers to follow exactly when and where the Mormon settlers settled or came into conflict with the US government or other US citizens.

Timeline:

March 1: Visit to Southern Utah University Archives

March 13: Visit to Mountain Meadows Massacre

March 27: We will publish a rough start of our website

April 24: Final website published

Tools:
-Wordpress
-Timeline Tool
-Mapping Tool (possibly MyMaps)
-Photoshop CS
-Camera
-SUU Archives

Responsibilities:
Madison will create the timeline from the start of LDS religion to the arrival in Utah. She will emphasis the major events that led to secession.

Eben will create the map for website visitors to view the progression of LDS pioneers from Illinois to Utah. Each important stop they made on the way will have a marker and information, as well as any relevant imagery.

We will each be responsible for finding at least 5 primary resources to contribute to our final website. Together, we will visit the Southern Utah University archives to research subject for our final project. We will also meet every Monday after our class to work on our project together.

“Without Sin” Reading Review

Spencer Klaw’s, “Without Sin: The Life and Death of the Oneida Community” is a fascinating overview of the Oneida community. Adherences of the Oneida community were a combination of Christian and Communist attempting to create a Utopian community and were led by John Humphrey Noyes. The Oneida community practiced several unusual principles, but were most notorious for their complex marriage system. They believed that every man was married to every woman and vice versa; through complex marriage, selfishness could be dissolved.

Analytically, the Oneida community had all of the major attributes of a cult. The leader had just enough power to exert over the community that they both loved him and worked for him. This book is a prime example of the complications of carrying out the Utopian or Communist society. Although a complex marriage system and its consequences may sound ideal to some, not everyone in the community is going to completely agree on the principles to carry in their lives.

Reading this introduction to Klaw’s work of the Oneida community was completely captivating. I found it interesting that the women of the Oneida community were almost egalitarian in the community, or at least compared to the rest of the 19th century United States. There was some control exerted over women, including not allowing long hair, however, men were the ones required to practice birth control and women did not have to bear more children than desired.

However, from just this small introduction to the Oneida community, it is hard to establish an opinion of whether this was a secessionist or separatist movement. Upon further research of the community and its collapse, I was able to form more of an opinion considering the Oneidas. After the original leader, John Humphrey Noyes, passed on the leadership to his son Theodore, the community began its decline. As a result of Theodore being agnostic, the community fell apart. From this background information, I believe that the decline of the Oneida community would be considered more of a separatist movement. The groups wanted to both be removed from each other and establish their own troops, however both failed. On the contrary, the separatist movement could be considered from the point of view as Noyes moved his community from Putney to Oneida New York, as a result of hostility from the surrounding community. Either way, I don’t believe that the separatist movement in the Oneida was the most prominent aspect of their history.

Barksdale Reading Reflection

Violence, Statecraft, and Statehood in the Early Republic : The State of Franklin, 1784–1788 by Kevin Barksdale

I found this section of the book fascinating.  I am currently taking a course titled “The History of Sports in America” and I never thought that it would be so contingent with this article by Kevin Barksdale.  In this course, we have discussed the Antebellum disgust towards such barbarous games like boxing or “rough and tumbling”.  The goal of boxing was to gouge out eyes and sometimes even castrate their opponents.  Much of those that participated in these violent sports were immigrants, mostly Irish.  However, immigrants and Americans alike dueled out for their honor in these boxing matches.

Barksdale includes this information in this article as he discusses the disgust and terror towards the Appalachians.  It’s interesting to read the analyzation of 2 separate governments that were fully functional inside the same state at the same time.  Those that identified themselves as citizens of The State of Franklin likewise did not identify themselves as citizens of North Carolina; and vice versa.  Citizens of the State of Franklin paid taxes, tribute, and followed those laws rather than the state of North Carolina and I believe that this is important to pay attention to for this class.  People inside this region chose where to commit their patronage to and this was a fully functional system for a couple of years.

I believe that it is important to note that Barksdale does not attribute the violent nature of The State of Franklin in the Appalachians to ethnic groups or large amounts of immigrants.  Violence was not engrained in Irish culture.  Barksdale attributes the violence of The State of Franklin to political instability, economic and political competition, and Native American resistance to western encroachment.

The separation of The State of Franklin was geographical, as a result of the Appalachians, and economical.  The western section of North Carolina declared its independence as The State of Franklin and created a leadership that they felt could defend and protect them from the ongoing Cherokee attacks.  This four year separatist movement inside of North Carolina was full of immense violence, as Barksdale explains.  There are many people that have attempted to attribute this violence to ethnic explanations, however, Barksdale goes into depth to explain that the violence stemmed from tensions of political and economic competition and Native American resistance.  However, once support ran out, Franklin-ites were forced to return to the State of Carolina.

Eben & Madison Project Proposal

For our website, we want to research the Mormon migration across the U.S. and into Utah territory following the lynching of Joseph Smith. We will emphasize the Latter Day Saint secession from the United States Government.   We would like to outline their path and the altercations they had with non-Mormons- peaceful and violent. Once they got to Utah, at that time part of Mexico, they believed they were free of U.S. control and Brigham Young (Joseph Smith’s controversial successor) established a theocracy in the territory. But after the Mexican-American War, the US gained the Utah Territory, and Mormons were subject once again to US jurisdiction. They were denied statehood for 50 years due to their polygamous practices, the third president of the LDS church (John Taylor) even stating “God is greater than the United States, and when the Government conflicts with heaven, we will be ranged under the banner of heaven against the Government. The United States says we cannot marry more than one wife. God says different”. The fourth president (Wilford Woodruff), however, ended polygamy in the faith after claiming to receive a revelation from God, and Utah gained statehood six years later. The ending of polygamy in the church caused one of its most major splits – into the LDS and FLDS (Fundamental) churches, the latter of which still practices polygamy to this day.

Throughout our research project we will emphasize multiple different secessionist movements.  Number one, the Latter Day Saint split from the United States Government.  Number two, the split in the LDS church itself and the FLDS secession from the LDS.  Number three, the suspected- and definitely spurious- claim that Utah is still trying to secede from the union.  

On the website itself, we will have an interactive map tracing the Mormon migration, with key points – settlements, battles, sabotage, etc – highlighted.  We will also include a timeline with our map.  With the large amount of resources Southern Utah has concerning the Mormon pioneers, we will be able to include actual journal entries, early settlement photos, and many more primary resources.