All posts by rankin

Progress Update!

Monday night, Abi and I worked on the format of our website. About three hours later, we have created what is up today. I’m feeling much more comfortable about the flow of the website and its overall look. I’m hoping it is less “jagged” than it was before. I know I have one page to put content on left, but otherwise I think the site is mainly done other than the feedback we get today, some photographs, and citations. All of which, I am confident will be completed before the beginning of next week. I’m now feeling a lot better about the site and I think Abi is too, which is a relief. I’ve had a lot of assignments due here at the beginning of the week, so I wasn’t able to do as much work on the site before today as I would have liked, but I think the time spent on the format of the website really was in our favor. After today, my involvement will be extremely heavy in this site. Like I said, I’ve just had many papers due this week and other various projects.

Progress Report for 4/17

So, I am currently finishing up the “Aftermath” page for our site. I think it is going rather well, but now I am thinking about the flow of the website more instead of content. I really am trying to make it so that the pages are cohesive and that they tie together instead of it being a hotbed of information. I’m now starting to think that I might have to break up some sections into other pages so that I can link them to other parts of the website. Unless someone knows how to link to a specific article section on a page…in which case, help? I’m also thinking about analysis in the site. I want to really make sure it’s clear. Like I mentioned before, I think this site is ultimately going to turn out to be a history version of SparkNotes, where the events and people are explained, and then the analysis is on the following page. I really want it to be simple, so that someone in high school doing a report can really understand what happened in the movement itself before delving into analysis. That way, if anything, they can understand the events of the movement. Then, if they want to read an interpretation of the events they can. I think this method really gives people a chance to think about the events and come up with their own interpretation before giving ours to the audience. I think it’s a good way of engaging high school students, because if they read our analysis first, then that is what they are going to agree with and write about instead of taking the time to really put things together themselves (Or was I the only one who was kind of guilty of that in high school?)

Frustration!

I created a whole page for the secession of Virginia to help better explain the political push towards West Virginia’s secession and then I realized that most of this information is already on the causes page. So after nearly completing it, I had to scrap it. I don’t want redundant information on the website, so it didn’t really make sense to have this page in the first place I suppose. I just put a lot of hard work into something that won’t be on the site instead of working on something else and I’m mainly just frustrated with myself. However, I have finally uploaded the photos on the “Political Profiles” page, so now it is looking even better than before. I want to spice the page up a bit more…but I’m not entirely sure how. I’ve included photographs of the men and I’ve included hyperlinks to two different collections we used to do research for this project. I have also linked the site to transcriptions of documents that came out of the conventions that are discussed on the page. Does anyone have any suggestions? It’s the point of the semester where the creativity has died and I hate every idea I come up with.

Website Layout Kinks

Last week, Abi and I had our weekly meeting to discuss the progress of our website. We updated our project contract to reflect the inability to make it to the archives over Spring Break. I think we are in a good place with the site as it is. We discussed adding in a new page titled “Political Profiles” (the name might change) to help visitors map out the changing political atmosphere so that they may better understand the shifts in views during this time. We also decided to break up the “Events” page listed under “Events.” I think it makes more sense to split it so that the secession of Virginia is not confused with the secession of West Virginia. I also thought that it would be too text heavy of a page and it would be too long. I wasn’t sure people would make it to the end of the page. Because of the split, I’ll have to re-do my timeline and split it into two different timelines for each respective page. I’m using the timeline as an overview/interactive visual at the top of the page so that viewers will have a general understanding of the events that took place so that when they scroll down they will be given more detail of each specified event in the timeline presented above.

Even More Updated Project Contract

Project Contract via blog post on Monday, February 13th

March 27th rough draft of website due

Project due by April 24th

 

Required in contract:

Project Description

Tools planned to use (Timeline, StoryMap, WordPress)

Work to be completed by each person

Milestone schedule

 

For this project we will be researching the secession of Western Virginia from Virginia during the early American Civil War. West Virginia secession took place both as a result of pro-Union sentiment and a strong opposition to taking part in a war advocated by elite Virginians. Over the previous fifty years, Western Virginians increasingly felt that they lacked fair taxation and representation in proportion to their contributions to the state. This included suppression not only of industry but expansion of the franchise for poor white males and increased access to education. One of the most pressing grievances was $20 million in debt for the state of Virginia, where associated improvements were felt mainly in the Tidewater region. With tensions building higher, the people from the Western region of the state took a call to action. As a result, the Richmond and the Wheeling Conventions were held. After Wheeling, the decision to secede was put to a vote that was backed by the Union Army. Those with Confederate sentiments retorted with violence with events such as the Jones-Imboden Raid. Through all the mayhem, West Virginia was eventually granted statehood on June 20, 1863.

 

This project will include the background and information of secessionists and the immediate aftereffects of the secession. Our goal is to provide accessible resources for West Virginians seeking to learn more about their state’s origins. To accomplish this goal, we intend to build an easy-to-use website with multiple pages outlining the causes of the secession, the event itself, and the consequences of it. There will be a homepage which provides an introduction to the event. It will also include a citation page to ensure our resources are properly cited, and a page explaining the origins and intentions of the project. We intend to use WordPress, StoryMap, and Timeline JS in building our website.

 

-Every Wednesday before class we will meet in person to discuss how the project is going-

 

Monday, February 13: Contract Draft Due (Abi + Kendall)

Thursday February 23: Contact to Archivists (Abi + Kendall)

Monday, February 27: StoryMap (Abi) and Timeline Due (Kendall)

Monday, March 1: Final draft of project Contract due (Abi + Kendall)

Monday, March 13-14: Intensive online archival research (Abi+Kendall)

Saturday, March 18- Monday March 27: Causes (Abi), Event (Kendall), and Effects (Kendall) Pages Due, About Page and Homepage Completed (Kendall), Citation Page Completed (Abi)

Monday, March 27: Rough Draft of Website Due (Abi + Kendall)

Wednesday, March 29: Meeting to refine the website (Abi + Kendall)

Wednesday, April 5: Make changes Based on Feedback from class (Abi + Kendall)

Thursday, April 6: Ask people outside the class to look at the website and give feedback (Abi + Kendall)

Wednesday, April 12: Finalize Changes Based on Feedback from Unfamiliar Users (Abi + Kendall)

Monday, April 24: Final Project Due

 

Each of us will be responsible for either the StoryMap or the Timeline. Each of us are responsible for constructing half of the pages for our website.

Progress Post

Unfortunately, my Grandfather passed away this week. It has been very difficult for me but I’m holding up as best as I can. I have had appointments with the health and counseling services here on campus. As for the project, I have a rough outline of what I want for my pages. I have completed by biography and such. I have also bullet-ed each of the points I want to make for the site. I know it does not seem like much, but I do have a lot of writing to accomplish and I am sure I will. I plan to write an article for the site a day from today on until I finish. I’m really excited about this and I think it will be a very good distraction for me so that I can delve into my work even more. I also worked on the pages and the orders of the pages with Abi last week. We finally came to a conclusion on what pages should be parent pages and which should be nested, etc. etc. She has been working on images for the site as well. I’m excited to see the final project come together.

Spring Break Progress

This break was not restful for me at all! I’ve been very busy in Florida with my Grandfather and his declining health. That being said, in my spare time I have looked through some of the collections in the digital archives of West Virginia University. In them, I have found more personal accounts of the secession of West Virginia and the roles they played in the Civil War. I was looking to find a more personal account of what really happened in this time instead of just the facts of what really happened. For me, it is extremely important to get the sentiment of the people in this time. I think presenting this through personal accounts will help draw people into the website a little more and it will also keep visitors engaged with it. I have also emailed the head of special collections here at UNCA to see if he knew of any other online resources that Abi and I might not have come across. We really wanted to visit the archives in West Virginia, but it is a six hour drive one way. Between the time restraints of classes and our jobs and the finances to get there (and possibly renting a room) it just did not seem feasible. However, I am hoping to see if any archives closer to us have any information that will be useful for our research.

Secondary Source Bibliography

 

“1830 Virginia Constitution.” West Virginia Archives and History. Accessed February 26, 2017. http://www.wvculture.org/history/government/182930cc.html.

 

African American Registry. “West Virginia Created by Secession from Southern Confederate State.” African American Registry. Accessed February 24, 2017. http://www.aaregistry.org/historic_events/view/west-virginia-created-secession-southern-confederate-state

 

“A State of Convenience: The Creation of West Virginia.” West Virginia Archives and History. Accessed February 26, 2017. http://www.wvculture.org/history/statehood/statehoodtoc.html.

 

Education @ Library of Virginia. “Virginia Convention Votes for Secession on April 17, 1861.” Library of Virginia. Accessed February 24, 2017. http://edu.lva.virginia.gov/online_classroom/union_or_secession/unit/9

 

Georgia’s Historic High Country Travel Association. “Second Wheeling Convention.” Georgia’s Blue and Gray Trail Presents America’s Civil War. Last Modified May 15, 2011. Accessed February 24, 2017. http://blueandgraytrail.com/event/Second_Wheeling_Convention

 

Riccards, Michael P. “Lincoln and the Political Question: The Creation of the State of West Virginia.” Presidential Studies Quarterly, 27, no. 3 (1997): 549-564. Accessed February 26, 2017. http://www.jstor.org/stable/27551768.

 

Manarin, Louis H. “Constitution of 1851.” e-WV: The West Virginia Encyclopedia. Last modified February 7, 2011. Accessed February 26, 2017. https://www.wvencyclopedia.org/articles/1550.

 

Virginia Military Institute. “Hunter’s Raid: General David Hunter and the Burning of VMI, June 1864.” Virginia Military Institute Archives. Accessed February 24, 2017. http://www.vmi.edu/archives/civil-war-and-new-market/hunters-raid/

Project Contract

 

For this project we will be researching the secession of Western Virginia from Virginia during the early American Civil War. West Virginia secession took place both as a result of pro-Union sentiment and a strong opposition to taking part in a war advocated by elite Virginians. Over the previous fifty years, Western Virginians increasingly felt that they lacked fair taxation and representation in proportion to their contributions to the state. This included suppression not only of industry but expansion of the franchise for poor white males and increased access to education. One of the most pressing grievances was $20 million in debt for the state of Virginia, where associated improvements were felt mainly in the Tidewater region. With tensions building higher, the people from the Western region of the state took a call to action. As a result, the Richmond and the Wheeling Conventions were held. After Wheeling, the decision to secede was put to a vote that was backed by the Union Army. Those with Confederate sentiments retorted with violence with events such as the Jones-Imboden Raid. Through all the mayhem, West Virginia was eventually granted statehood on June 20, 1863.

 

This project will include the background and information of secessionists and the immediate aftereffects of the secession. Our goal is to provide accessible resources for West Virginians seeking to learn more about their state’s origins. To accomplish this goal, we intend to build an easy-to-use website with multiple pages outlining the causes of the secession, the event itself, and the consequences of it. There will be a homepage which provides an introduction to the event. It will also include a citation page to ensure our resources are properly cited, and a page explaining the origins and intentions of the project. We intend to use WordPress, StoryMap, and Timeline JS in building our website.

 

-Every Wednesday before class we will meet in person to discuss how the project is going-

 

Monday, February 13: Contract Draft Due (Abi + Kendall)

Thursday February 23: Contact to Archivists (Abi + Kendall)

Monday, February 27: StoryMap (Abi) and Timeline Due (Kendall)

Monday, March 1: Final draft of project Contract due (Abi + Kendall)

Monday, March 13-14: Visit to Archive (Abi + Kendall)

Saturday, March 18: Causes (Abi), Event (Kendall), and Effects (Kendall) Pages Due

Monday, March 20: About Page and Homepage Completed (Kendall)

Friday, March 24: Citation Page Completed (Abi)

Monday, March 27: Rough Draft of Website Due (Abi + Kendall)

Wednesday, March 29: Meeting to refine the website (Abi + Kendall)

Wednesday, April 5: Make changes Based on Feedback from class (Abi + Kendall)

Thursday, April 6: Ask people outside the class to look at the website and give feedback (Abi + Kendall)

Wednesday, April 12: Finalize Changes Based on Feedback from Unfamiliar Users (Abi + Kendall)

Monday, April 24: Final Project Due

 

Each of us will be responsible for either the StoryMap or the Timeline. Each of us are responsible for constructing half of the pages for our website. We plan to travel to the archives together, so that the research will be split 50/50. Each of us is responsible for contacting and negotiating with one archivist for our archival visits.